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  • Nuclear receptors rock around the clock
    1. Xuan Zhao1,,
    2. Han Cho1,,
    3. Ruth T Yu1,
    4. Annette R Atkins1,
    5. Michael Downes1 and
    6. Ronald M Evans*,1,2
    1. 1Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, USA
    2. 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, USA
    1. *Corresponding author. Tel: +1 858 453 4100; Fax: +1 858 455 1349; E‐mail: evans{at}salk.edu
    1. These authors contributed equally to this work.

    This review discusses the role of nuclear receptors as key integral regulators of the core circadian clock, and how they coordinate and integrate circadian and metabolic rhythms.

    • circadian clock
    • metabolism
    • nuclear receptors
    • REV‐ERB
    • ROR
    • Received November 25, 2013.
    • Revision received March 11, 2014.
    • Accepted March 11, 2014.

    This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

    Xuan Zhao, Han Cho, Ruth T Yu, Annette R Atkins, Michael Downes, Ronald M Evans
  • Tumor microenvironment revisited
    1. Anton Berns (a.berns{at}nki.nl) 1,2 and
    2. Pier Paolo Pandolfi3
    1. 1Division of Molecular Genetics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. 2Skoltech Centre for Stem Cell Research Skolkovo Institute for Science and Technology, Moscow, Russia
    3. 3Department of Medicine and Pathology, Cancer Research Institute Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the microenvironment of a tumor can affect many tumor characteristics including the response to therapeutical intervention. Therefore, to fully understand tumor development and progression, a deeper knowledge of the communication between cancer cells and their stroma is needed and some of the open questions in this field will be discussed at an EMBO/EMBL symposium held in the beginning of May 2014 in Heidelberg.

    Anton Berns, Pier Paolo Pandolfi
  • Elements and machinery of non‐coding RNAs: toward their taxonomy
    1. Tetsuro Hirose1,
    2. Yuichiro Mishima2,3 and
    3. Yukihide Tomari*,2,3
    1. 1Institute for Genetic Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan
    2. 2Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo‐ku, Tokyo, Japan
    3. 3Department of Medical Genome Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo‐ku Tokyo, Japan
    1. *Corresponding author. Tel: +81 3 5841 7839; Fax: +81 3 5841 8485; E‐mail: tomari{at}iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    This review compares the RNA elements, processing proteins, RNP machineries, and ncRNA functions of siRNA, miRNA, piRNA, crRNA, and lncRNA classes and proposes that knowledge of the relationship between these elements might enable the systematic classification of ncRNAs.

    • CRISPR
    • lncRNA
    • miRNA
    • piRNA
    • siRNA
    • Received December 19, 2013.
    • Revision received March 4, 2014.
    • Accepted March 10, 2014.
    Tetsuro Hirose, Yuichiro Mishima, Yukihide Tomari
  • The two‐faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism
    1. Iliana A Chatzispyrou1 and
    2. Riekelt H Houtkooper (r.h.houtkooper{at}amc.nl) 1
    1. 1Laboratory Genetic Metabolic Diseases, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces lamins A and C through alternative splicing. Due to this mutation, HGPS patients express an incompletely processed form of lamin A called progerin. In this issue of EMBO Reports [1], the Tazi group demonstrates how mice expressing different LMNA isoforms present opposite phenotypes in longevity, fat storage and mitochondrial function.

    See also: IC Lopez‐Mejia et al

    A study in this issue shows that the LMNA gene encodes functionally distinct isoforms that have opposite effects on energy metabolism and lifespan. Mice expressing lamin C only are obese and have an extended lifespan, whereas mice expressing progerin are lean and die early.

    Iliana A Chatzispyrou, Riekelt H Houtkooper
  • New genes important for development
    1. Claus Kemkemer1 and
    2. Manyuan Long (mlong{at}uchicago.edu) 1
    1. 1Department of Ecology and Evolution, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

    The genomic revolution and new sequencing technologies are allowing scientists to pick apart the origin of new genes and how they assume vital roles in development, despite their absence from perfectly viable ancestral species.

    Claus Kemkemer, Manyuan Long
  • Revisiting “Is the scientific paper a fraud?”The way textbooks and scientific research articles are being used to teach undergraduate students could convey a misleading image of scientific research
    The way textbooks and scientific research articles are being used to teach undergraduate students could convey a misleading image of scientific research

    The way textbooks and scientific research articles are being used to teach undergraduate students could convey a misleading image of scientific research

    1. Susan M Howitt (susan.howitt{at}anu.edu.au) 1 and
    2. Anna N Wilson2
    1. 1Research School of Biology Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    2. 2Faculty of Education, Science, Technology and Mathematics, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia

    Scientific papers and textbooks fulfill an important purpose but provide only a sanitized account of how research works in practice. To understand the nature of research itself, undergraduate and graduate students need to be exposed to a more realistic view of research.

    Susan M Howitt, Anna N Wilson
  • More than beef and tangoAn interview with Lino Barañao, the Minister of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation in Argentina
    An interview with Lino Barañao, the Minister of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation in Argentina

    An interview with Lino Barañao, the Minister of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation in Argentina

    1. Howy Jacobs1,2 and
    2. Holger Breithaupt (breithau{at}embl-heidelberg.de) 2
    1. 1Universities of Tampere and Helsinki, Finland
    2. 2EMBO, Heidelberg, Germany

    An interview with Lino Barañao about the challenges and successes so far to create a solid research base in Argentina and improve the country's potential for innovation.

    Howy Jacobs, Holger Breithaupt