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  • The public in peer review
    The public in peer review
    1. Michele S Garfinkel, Manager (michele.garfinkel{at}embo.org) 1
    1. 1EMBO Science Policy Programme EMBO, Heidelberg, Germany

    Patients and the wider public are increasingly involved in the assessment of science by funders and journals. The correct timing of such involvement—from study design to publication—is critical to ensure that their views have a real and relevant impact.

    Michele S Garfinkel
  • Mitochondrial replacement to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial DNA disease
    Mitochondrial replacement to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial DNA disease
    1. Mary Herbert (mary.herbert{at}ncl.ac.uk) 1 and
    2. Doug Turnbull (doug.turnbull{at}ncl.ac.uk) 2
    1. 1Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    2. 2Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

    New regulations passed in the UK pave the way for treatments using mitochondrial replacement to allow families with mitochondrial DNA disorders to have healthy children, and improve the lives of patients living with such diseases.

    This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Mary Herbert, Doug Turnbull
  • Lost in post‐translation
    Lost in post‐translation
    1. Olivier Putois1,
    2. François Villa1 and
    3. Jonathan B Weitzman (jonathan.weitzman{at}univ-paris-diderot.fr) 2
    1. 1Center for Research in Psychoanalysis, Medicine and Society (EA 3522), Sorbonne Paris Cité Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France
    2. 2Epigenetics and Cell Fate, UMR 7216 CNRS Sorbonne Paris Cité Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France

    The names we choose to describe or define biological concepts can have a huge impact on the way we think. It is time to reflect on whether certain terms, even those as fundamental as “translation”, are still appropriate for the scientific lexicon.

    Olivier Putois, François Villa, Jonathan B Weitzman
  • MPP8 and SIRT1 crosstalk in E‐cadherin gene silencing and epithelial–mesenchymal transition
    MPP8 and SIRT1 crosstalk in E‐cadherin gene silencing and epithelial–mesenchymal transition
    1. Lidong Sun1,
    2. Kenji Kokura1,
    3. Victoria Izumi2,
    4. John M Koomen2,
    5. Edward Seto2,
    6. Jiandong Chen2 and
    7. Jia Fang*,1
    1. 1Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA
    2. 2Department of Molecular Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA
    1. *Corresponding author. Tel: +1 813 745 6716; Fax: +1 813 745 7264; E‐mail: jia.fang{at}moffitt.org

    This study shows that two repressive chromatin modifiers, MPP8 and SIRT1, reciprocally promote each other's function through their physical interaction to coordinate epithelial gene silencing and promote EMT.

    Synopsis

    This study shows that two repressive chromatin modifiers, MPP8 and SIRT1, reciprocally promote each other's function through their physical interaction to coordinate epithelial gene silencing and promote EMT.

    • SIRT1 counteracts MPP8‐K439 acetylation catalyzed by PCAF to protect MPP8 from ubiquitin‐proteasome‐mediated degradation.

    • MPP8 binds to methyl‐H3K9 on target promoters and recruits SIRT1 to preferentially deacetylate H4K16 for transcription repression.

    • MPP8 not only interacts with the EMT‐inducing transcription factor ZEB1 but also facilitates ZEB1‐SIRT1 protein interaction.

    • EMT
    • histone deacetylation
    • H3K9 methylation
    • transcription repression
    • Received October 27, 2014.
    • Revision received March 16, 2015.
    • Accepted March 17, 2015.
    Lidong Sun, Kenji Kokura, Victoria Izumi, John M Koomen, Edward Seto, Jiandong Chen, Jia Fang
  • Stem cell and progenitor fate in the mammalian intestine: Notch and lateral inhibition in homeostasis and disease
    Stem cell and progenitor fate in the mammalian intestine: Notch and lateral inhibition in homeostasis and disease
    1. Rocio Sancho*,1,,
    2. Catherine A Cremona1, and
    3. Axel Behrens*,1,2
    1. 1Mammalian Genetics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, Lincoln's Inn Fields Laboratories, London, UK
    2. 2School of Medicine, King's College London, London, UK
    1. * Corresponding author. Tel: +44 207 269 3234; E‐mail: rocio.sancho{at}cancer.org.uk

      Corresponding author. Tel: +44 207 269 3361; E‐mail: axel.behrens{at}cancer.org.uk

    1. These authors contributed equally to this work

    This review discusses recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which Notch‐mediated lateral inhibition regulates stem cell fates in health and disease.

    • intestinal stem cells
    • lateral inhibition
    • Notch
    • Received February 3, 2015.
    • Revision received March 10, 2015.
    • Accepted March 11, 2015.
    Rocio Sancho, Catherine A Cremona, Axel Behrens
  • Wnt directs the endosomal flux of LDL‐derived cholesterol and lipid droplet homeostasis
    Wnt directs the endosomal flux of LDL‐derived cholesterol and lipid droplet homeostasis
    1. Cameron C Scott1,
    2. Stefania Vossio1,
    3. Fabrizio Vacca1,
    4. Berend Snijder25,
    5. Jorge Larios1,
    6. Olivier Schaad1,
    7. Nicolas Guex3,
    8. Dmitry Kuznetsov3,
    9. Olivier Martin3,
    10. Marc Chambon4,
    11. Gerardo Turcatti4,
    12. Lucas Pelkmans2 and
    13. Jean Gruenberg*,1
    1. 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
    2. 2Faculty of Sciences, Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    3. 3Vital‐IT Group, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    4. 4Biomolecular Screening Facility, SV‐PTECH‐PTCB, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
    5. 5CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Vienna, Austria
    1. *Corresponding author. Tel: +41 22 379 3464; E‐mail: jean.gruenberg{at}unige.ch

    This study reports that Wnt signaling regulates the production of lipid droplets in a process that strictly depends on endocytosed, LDL‐derived cholesterol and functional endosomes.

    Synopsis

    This study reports that Wnt signaling regulates the production of lipid droplets in a process that strictly depends on endocytosed, LDL‐derived cholesterol and functional endosomes.

    • High‐content screening reveals that Wnt controls cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

    • Wnt stimulation induces accumulation of lipid droplets.

    • Wnt mobilizes LDL‐derived cholesterol through endosomes.

    • canonical Wnt signaling
    • endosomes
    • functional genomics
    • LDL‐derived cholesterol
    • lipid droplets
    • Received January 12, 2015.
    • Revision received March 5, 2015.
    • Accepted March 6, 2015.
    Cameron C Scott, Stefania Vossio, Fabrizio Vacca, Berend Snijder, Jorge Larios, Olivier Schaad, Nicolas Guex, Dmitry Kuznetsov, Olivier Martin, Marc Chambon, Gerardo Turcatti, Lucas Pelkmans, Jean Gruenberg
  • Access to human tissues for research and product developmentFrom EU regulation to alarming legal developments in Belgium
    Access to human tissues for research and product development

    From EU regulation to alarming legal developments in Belgium

    1. Jean‐Paul Pirnay (jean-ul.pirnay{at}mil.be) 1,
    2. Etienne Baudoux2,
    3. Olivier Cornu3,
    4. Alain Delforge4,
    5. Christian Delloye3,
    6. Johan Guns5,
    7. Ernst Heinen6,
    8. Etienne Van den Abbeel7,
    9. Alain Vanderkelen1,
    10. Caroline Van Geyt8,
    11. Ivan van Riet9,
    12. Gilbert Verbeken1,
    13. Petra De Sutter7,
    14. Michiel Verlinden10,
    15. Isabelle Huys10,11,
    16. Julian Cockbain12,
    17. Christian Chabannon13,14,15,
    18. Kris Dierickx16,
    19. Paul Schotsmans16,
    20. Daniel De Vos1,
    21. Thomas Rose17,
    22. Serge Jennes17 and
    23. Sigrid Sterckx18
    1. 1Human Cell and Tissue Banks, Laboratory for Molecular and Cellular Technology, Queen Astrid Military Hospital, Brussel, Belgium
    2. 2Laboratory of Cellular and Gene Therapy, University Hospital Liège, Liège, Belgium
    3. 3Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Department, Cliniques Universitaires St‐Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussel, Belgium
    4. 4Service d'Hématologie Expérimentale‐Laboratoire de Thérapie Cellulaire Clinique, Université Libre de Bruxelles‐Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles, Belgium
    5. 5Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium
    6. 6Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Human Histology, Immunology Centre, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
    7. 7Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium
    8. 8Tissue Bank, Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium
    9. 9Division of Clinical Hematology, UZ Brussel, Brussel, Belgium
    10. 10Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
    11. 11Centre for Intellectual Property Rights, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
    12. 12Consultant European Patent Attorney, Gent, Belgium
    13. 13Centre de Thérapie Cellulaire, Département de Biologie du Cancer, Institut Paoli‐Calmettes, Marseille Cedex, France
    14. 14Aix‐Marseille Université (AMU), Marseille, France
    15. 15Inserm‐Centre d'Investigations Cliniques en Biothérapie (CBT)‐510, Marseille, France
    16. 16Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
    17. 17Burn Wound Centre, Queen Astrid Military Hospital, Brussel, Belgium
    18. 18Department of Philosophy and Moral Sciences, Bioethics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium

    Private biotech companies are increasingly seeking to research and create products that use human cells and tissues from public biobanks. Greater discussion is needed about the serious legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of donated biological material to generate profit.

    This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs 4.0 License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

    Jean‐Paul Pirnay, Etienne Baudoux, Olivier Cornu, Alain Delforge, Christian Delloye, Johan Guns, Ernst Heinen, Etienne Van den Abbeel, Alain Vanderkelen, Caroline Van Geyt, Ivan van Riet, Gilbert Verbeken, Petra De Sutter, Michiel Verlinden, Isabelle Huys, Julian Cockbain, Christian Chabannon, Kris Dierickx, Paul Schotsmans, Daniel De Vos, Thomas Rose, Serge Jennes, Sigrid Sterckx